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STDs

Posted by MDViews on January 4, 2005

An article on STDs from Kidshealth.org is found on the Yahoo site here. It’s entited, “How to talk to your kids about STD’s”. This one leaves you cold in its casual treatment of the risk and horror of STD’s that young women face.

The article expounds,

Teens are one of the groups most at risk for contracting STDs. You can help your child stay safe just by talking to him and sharing some important information about STDs and prevention.

Somehow, that just lacks something important. True, teens do contract STDs at an alarming rate, but only the ones who are sexually active or promiscuous. Aslo, sharing important information about STDs and prevention has little effect on preventing risky sexual behavior or any sexual behavior in my view, at least based on my 23 years as a gynecologist. Wouldn’t a firm moral education accompanied by an intact family who models moral behavior be more effective? I think so.

Further, the article recommends discussion of STDs in middle school or preteen.

OK, I’ll grant that the internet, DVDs, movie rentals, latch-key kids with cable TV, promiscuous peers, public school sex ed and the like expose youngsters to sexual information aplenty. But does or should that exposure lead a parent to a detailed discussion of STDs with a pre-pubecsent girl or boy? Especially in the context they imply? Especially if sex has not crossed there minds in any significant way? Wouldn’t it be better to answer questions in a straightforward way as they arise?

I view sex education of a graphic nature given to pre-teen boys and girls as a form of child abuse. You wouldn’t take your pre-teen to an R-rated movie with sexually graphic scenes, so why expose them to graphic sexual descriptions before they are ready?

When I was on call one night back in the early 90’s, I was watching C-Span. They were covering Phyllis Schlaffly of the Eagle Forum discussing some new legislative push for comprehensive sex ed. I loved her talk. She said, and I’m paraphrasing from memory here, “What’s so hard about sex education? It’s easy. Tell them not to have sex until they are married. Do you need a whole class for that? I’ll say it again. Don’t have sex until married.”

The article adds this pearl:

And don’t shy away from discussing STDs or sex out of fear that talking about it will make your teen want to have sex. Informed teens are not more likely to have sex, but they are more likely to practice safe sex.

And this bold assertion is based on…research done by those who advocate younger and younger sex ed of a more and more graphic nature. Sorry, I’ve known researchers. The abortionists and the family planning types always have an agenda. And agenda based research usually reaches expected conclusions or never sees the light of day. So their conclusions should be suspect.

And what’s this phrase safe sex? Not even the most radical use that term anymore. It’s called “safer sex” because no sex is safe sex outside monogamous marriage.

The article concludes:

Explain that the only sure way to remain STD-free is to not have sex or intimate contact with anyone. Any teen who is having sex should always use a latex condom, preferably with a spermicidal foam, cream, or jelly that contains nonoxynol-9. While nonxynol-9 has been shown to reduce the risk of contracting gonorrhea and chlamydia, it is important to note that nonoxynol-9 does not protect against AIDS.

Lip service is given to abstinence, something that would not have even been mentioned in the 70’s and 80’s. Thanks to all the thinking, caring conservative parents and educators who have fought and still fight the good fight informing people about abstinence programs and their success, this concept has worked its way into mainstream thought and must be acknowledged.

Finally, they advocate condom usage, but why? Name the studies that demonstrate reductions in STD rates with condom usage. Their aren’t many. For more details, I would refer you to The Medical Institute for Sexual Health, which has volumes of good, reliable information.

Psalm 27:14 (ESV) Wait for the LORD ; be strong and take heart and wait for the LORD . Good advise indeed.


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